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US army ranger transfer

Discussion in 'Introductions & Welcome to the Royal Marines Site' started by Confusedindividual, Feb 13, 2017.

  1. Confusedindividual

    Confusedindividual New Member

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  2. Confusedindividual

    Confusedindividual New Member

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    I'll type the diffrence after I eat.
     
  3. Confusedindividual

    Confusedindividual New Member

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    Okay so Ranger school = leadership school that sucks. 61 days. Most spend longer then that there. My buddy went back in August still not back. I spent 61 days tho. You starve and get sleep deprived you turn into a tiny twig with no strength. You just get a tab. Every E- 5 sergeant in reg will go through ranger school. It's a tradition. You can have a ranger tan and not be a real ranger.
    Ranger reg = is the actual rangers we are the ones that conduct all the raids and support delta.
     
  4. Rover

    Rover Moderator

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    As regards ‘Leadership’ you may find the following of interest. The link at the bottom being a good read.

    Junior commando leaders tested to the limit

    29/07/2015

    The Royal Marines Junior Command Course is where young aspiring marines take the first step on the promotion ladder. It is one of the most challenging courses a marine can expect to attend in his career.

    The Junior Command Course (known as the JCC or Juniors) is 11 weeks long and is run at the Marines Lympstone training base.

    “The overall idea of the Juniors is to assess individuals command and leadership and allow them to take their place in 3 Commando Brigade as a junior commander,” says CSgt Tug Wilson, 38, the JCC Chief Instructor.

    “We take young marines who have been in the Corps between four and eight years, we place them on a command course and we teach them how to instruct, how to lead, and how to command soldiers on operations.”

    The JCC encompasses a revision phase in the first two weeks where the students are taught by outside instructors from Central Training Team. The first time the actual course instructors get to meet the students is on the log run at the end of the second week.

    The course is modular. It has an instructional technique element with students having to deliver a series of lectures and practical lessons.

    They also have to pass a command and leadership element where they deliver a set of NATO standard orders which is then followed by carrying out the action on the ground.

    During the JCC students deploy on four exercises including two on Sennybridge, an urban combat exercise at Caerwent and an amphibious cliff assault exercise in Plymouth. They also spend a week in north Devon practicing eight man section attacks which is vital skill for a junior leader.

    There is a navigation package as part of their individual skills. This includes three night navigation exercises (navex’s) over 10-11 km and three static map stances which need to be passed.

    “Being able to assault the enemy is only part of our role,” says CSgt Wilson. “Being able to find the enemy, being able to avoid the enemy, being able to read the ground and use it to our advantage, are all things that a junior leader needs to know.”

    There is a fieldcraft package the student must pass plus three military knowledge tests. Finally the students are assessed on their personal qualities, such as their physical bearing, their determination, their level of commitment and their judgement.

    “We’re producing a man that work by sea or land that can interact with civilians, refugees, the navy, the air force, the army and civilian agencies,” says CSgt Wilson.

    “We’re trying to get an individual that can produce work to a high standard and that can instruct to a high standard as well. I like to think that we are going to get a more intelligent individual who is going to have a whole host of things in an ammo pouch he can draw on when he needs to.”

    As you would expect from a Royal Marines course the JCC incorporates plenty of fitness. On the first morning the students do a four mile speed march with 32 lbs of equipment. This is one of the criteria tests which students must pass or they are returned to unit.

    Other tests include a log run over the infamous endurance course on Woodbury Common and a battle swimming test.

    They also have an assault course physical session before deploying to Plymouth on a 24 hour exercise where they are dropped at the base of cliffs at night which they then scale in true Commando style before carrying out a troop attack.

    The course makes wide use of technology. Instructors carry tablets and cameras and are able to video attacks and then replay them to the students. “We can use that video to show someone what they did on the ground at that time and whether that was the right or wrong thing to do. So we’re offing feedback at the greatest level we ever could,” says CSgt Wilson.

    The JCC has been trialling the use of tactical engagement simulation (TES) equipment. This allows troops to be tracked on the ground by GPS and each marine’s weapon fires a laser which is registered on other troops’ equipment.

    “The TES kit gives us the ability to track individuals, to see where they patrol to, to identify their fire and how many people are hitting targets, how many people are missing targets, and who gets ‘killed’,” says CSgt Wilson.

    “It means you can conduct an after action review where you can play that incident back to someone and show them on video and on the computer how they performed and what they did and what their decision making on the ground led to other individuals doing. That’s invaluable to the Juniors.”

    During the exercises in Devon and Wales the students spend most of their time giving orders using models of the area or taking part in patrols. The orders process is comprehensive as every marine needs to know and understand the mission so they can continue it alone if required.

    The exercises are arduous and students get very limited amounts of time to sleep.

    “It’s rightly a demanding course,” says CSgt Wilson. “To pass it you need to be determined. I’ve never been more tired or cold than I have on operations and I think we replicate the effects of combat as best as we can in a safe environment.”

    Following the 11 week Junior Command Course many of the new Corporals will attend a Skill at Arms course where they learn how to conduct weapon training and safely run shooting ranges.

    “I want these junior leaders to look like soldiers in the first instance,” says CSgt Wilson. “I want them to have the bearing and maturity of a commander. I want them to have the professional ethos that the Corps aspires to, and I want them to have confidence.”

    “When a guy leaves here he should be confident that he could lead a rifle section on operations given all the instruction and knowledge that he’s had,” he adds.

    https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/530754/Navy_FOI_2016_05359___Royal_Marines_Modified_Command_Course.pdf
     
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  5. Confusedindividual

    Confusedindividual New Member

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    So you guys do have your own type of course kinda like it.
     
  6. Rover

    Rover Moderator

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    A few....

    Armoured Support (AS), Armourer (ARM), Assault Engineer (AE), Clerk (C), Combat Intelligence (CI), Driver (D), Drill Instructor (DI), General Duties (GD), Heavy Weapons (Air Defence) (HW(AD), Heavy Weapons (Anti-Tank) (HW(ATK)), Heavy Weapons (Mortars) (HW(MOR)), Landing Craft (LC), Metalsmith (MESM), Mountain Leader (ML), Physical Training Instructor (PTI), Platoon Weapons (Machine Gunner) (PW(MG)), Platoon Weapons (Sniper) (PW(S)),

    A Corps of Specialists, Royal Marines Aircrewman (RMAC), Royal Marines Communications Technician (RMCT) Royal Marines Information Systems (RMIS), Royal Marines Medical Assistant (RMMA), Royal Marines Police (RMP), Signaller (S), Special Forces Communicator (SFC), Stores Accountant (SA), Telecommunications Technician (TT), Vehicle Mechanic (VM)
     
  7. DD

    DD Well-Known Member

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    @Confusedindividual Not sure how the weather is wherever you are across the atlantic but it may be worth spending a couple months training here to condition your body to the local climate.
     
  8. wellmemedmyboy

    wellmemedmyboy Member

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    Anyone that knows, could they please detail about the TACP role offered in the corps and how to get there? I'm getting stoked on signalling at the moment in what I do- no signals, no point being in dangerous OPs and CTRs!
     
  9. bharry96

    bharry96 Guest

    TACP are effectively Forward Air Controllers. FACs within the Corp are in the Sigs branch. Every TACP has four members, including one officer.

    The link below is about FAC training. All 3 branches go here to do the FAC course.
    https://www.raf.mod.uk/rafleeming/aboutus/jfactsuhome.cfm

    Also after a few years in the sigs branch you can try to go for MAOT (Mobile Air Ops Teams). They typically go ahead with the recce group to establish a HLZ. They are also attached to M Flight ( RN Maritime CT) for MCT tasking with poole.
     
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  10. wellmemedmyboy

    wellmemedmyboy Member

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    Cheers for that thank you
     
  11. bharry96

    bharry96 Guest

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