Vibram Five Fingers, Opinion?

WelshLad91

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Alrite lads basically all of my running life since training for marines and that i've always suffered with shin splints. I've found out the cause ( i over-pronate, not alot but i have a slight roll ) But they've always come back. I've had custom insoles, i've tried stretching and strengthening but they always seem to come back. I don't suffer with really bad shin splints but i do get a bit of pain. Now i've done a good bit of research about the Vibrams and the results are pretty awsome, a lot of people have eliminated shin splints from them and other kinds of injury's. I know i heel strike alot and that's probably another reason why i keep having bad shins. I'm going to try change my stride to mid foot before i get into RT because guaranteed if i go into RT with the way i run now i'll just get MD'd for shin splints. Think it's worth getting some Five fingers? I know in RT i'll be running in boots but if i learn to run mid foot now will i be able to still keep that stride with boots on?

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OneMoreWrap

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I have had quite a lot of interest in minimilist style running shoes, such as the five fingers.

The topic always ends the same way and I'm always told to stick to regular running shoes. They have the best support and aslong as you make your running style more rhythmic you should avoid shin splints or injuries of the sort. I had slight muscle cramps about a month ago in the front of my leg and changed my style to a smoother style, no problems since.

Nike free runs would be the best minimilist trainers, five fingers would be a risky purchase.
 

ross90rmc

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Try it if you want mate. I was heel striking and causing myself some problems with Achilles tendinitis. I simply started taking note of my running stride and making a conscious effort to change it.

I think my problem was I was over stretching my stride to speed up, as opposed to simply making more strides. I changed it, shortened my steps, and in the process stopped my lower back aching on long runs.

It was completely down to my posture/running style. I didn't use vibram shoes, but it took up to about 5 weeks of running (tedious running) changing my style. Can't hurt to try the vibrams if you want to mate, but it can be done other ways.
 

WelshLad91

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I know my mistake, i certainly over stride epically when sprinting and always land on my heel! I've got my PRMC in 3 weeks so can't really change much now but i think i will buy some KSO's now and just walk in them then after PRMC ( hopefully pass ) i'll start running in them and working on my stride.
 

ross90rmc

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Yeah it's not a short term thing it does take some doing. You naturally "heel strike" when walking, so it's commonly done when people start running. If its causing you some trouble though then I'd definitely try and do all you can to change it.

I'm not sure other Things such as your gait can be changed I think that's just naturally how your foot lands, but stride and heel striking can change.

I got my gait assessed again and watched the video ad the woman said I was "very neutral" landing almost flat footed, slightly on my toes. So it can be done.

Just concentrate on cracking prmc and tryin to minimise injury for now and look at doing it in the space between then and RT.
 

WelshLad91

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Yeah it's not a short term thing it does take some doing. You naturally "heel strike" when walking, so it's commonly done when people start running. If its causing you some trouble though then I'd definitely try and do all you can to change it.

I'm not sure other Things such as your gait can be changed I think that's just naturally how your foot lands, but stride and heel striking can change.

I got my gait assessed again and watched the video ad the woman said I was "very neutral" landing almost flat footed, slightly on my toes. So it can be done.

Just concentrate on cracking prmc and tryin to minimise injury for now and look at doing it in the space between then and RT.
Yeah mate i've been down to lympstone before and im fitter and stronger than last time so hopefully i'll smash this PRMC. Then after PRMC i'll concentrate strengthening all my lower leg muscles properly.
 

Utopia

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I've covered this many times so I'll keep my post short and sweet for now:

Vibrams have been the best thing I have ever done for my running.

A slightly longer explanation is that when you change to them, everything about the way you run changes. However, the transition has taken me about 12 months to become proficient using them, but even now, my calves tire faster than a runner in normal shoes, however, the rest of me works far more efficiently. Oh and the transition to boots is a non issue. The only difference will be the extra weight.
 

ross90rmc

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Yeah mate i've been down to lympstone before and im fitter and stronger than last time so hopefully i'll smash this PRMC. Then after PRMC i'll concentrate strengthening all my lower leg muscles properly.
Sounds good mate. It's been a while since my prmc but it looks like the main issue is the return 4 miler after endurance...best of luck.
 

Luke0212

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Vibrams have been the best thing I have ever done for my running.
Ditto

I got a pair last year after suffering on-and-off with shin splints, they worked wonders. Completely changes your running technique, I have found I run far more efficiently now and have a much lighter heel strike if I choose to switch to that style. Also they are very nice for circuit training, especially moves like squats, deadlifts, most kettlebell work, etc.

HOWEVER:
- They are expensive. Maybe try going to a local field and just go barfoot for practice (watch out for dog poo)
- Start of small. I spent two weeks just walking everywhere in them to strengthen my feet prior to attempting any runs, don't jump straight into any 3 milers
 

itslikethat

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Get them is all I can say mate. But it's been said, easy into running in them gently. Deffinatly don't go for a run in the first time, go for walks. Because they serioulsy hurt !

I've got a pair and the first 1.5 mile return I did in them I got 9-38 and I was hitting 10 minutes plus in my asics.

Get them after the prmc to strengthen your calfs and hamstrings. They do majorly hurt on long distances. I *text deleted** for an 8 mile run the other day in them on concrete and my calfs are unbeleiveably tight.

I'm using them for sprints mostly. Nice and light. I do NOT recommend running long distances on concrete, even when you have alot of miles in them under your belt. Because they just put to much pressure on joints.

GET THEM!
 

Eyebrows

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I'll throw in my two penneth too.

There are generally two camps here. What you need to remember is that sometimes even specialists will advise against barefoot running because they believe in a different theory. And thats all it is at the end of the day, a theory.

Personally I'm in the barefoot camp of the theories.

In my opinion this is how you should transistion into barefoot running.

1. Go for some completely barefoot walks on tarmac and pavements, preferebly with short sections of gravel (avoid softer ground as it replicates the cushion of running shoes.) - do this for 1-2 weeks

2. Put some calf exercises into your circuit.

3. Do about a mile barefoot twice a week 1 week (I threw in a 2.5 miler in between these in vibrams- just to keep my distance up a bit)

4. Up the distance to about 1.5 miles barefoot 1 week keeping that vibram run in the middle if you want

5. Up it to about 2 miles for about 2 weeks

6. Continues to do this until your feet have toughened up and more importantly you have transitioned into the style.

The important thing is your style not what you have on your feet.
but barefooting it is the quickest and easiest way to get the style.

It may sound a little mad to go completely barefoot but even vibram advise going 100% barefoot before donning the fivefingers.

Walking in vibrams to start off won't do too much.

Sources: Born to Run- Chris Mcdougall, Barefoot running by Barefoot Ken Bob and VIBRAM.

Any questions, just ask
 

WelshLad91

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Cheers lads awesome for all the replys, appreciate it! I'm going to order some tomorrow morning, ( got lucky the weekend and won ?110 from a ?2 football bet Haha) I'll give that barefoot walking a go this week Dug definitely. Would you guys advise getting them now before my PRMC and just walking in them to get used to them ect? Or wait untill after my PRMC and start fresh with them then? I'll build up nice and slowly from wearing them for 1hour to hopefully running 3-5 miles in them. I've done a fair bit of research and HOPEFULLY this will finally help strengthen my feet/lower legs and get rid of the dreaded shin splints! :uglyhammer:

Cheers, James.
 

itslikethat

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In my experience mate, dont run in them before the ormc because your calfs take a pouding and it takes a while to get them back to normal !

Run in the after to strengthen your calfs, but dont before mate.
 

WelshLad91

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In my experience mate, dont run in them before the ormc because your calfs take a pouding and it takes a while to get them back to normal !

Run in the after to strengthen your calfs, but dont before mate.
Yeah will do mate, isit worth getting them now before PRMC to walk in and that or no no?
 

Luke0212

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3 weeks until PRMC - definitely DO NOT run in them, however getting them and doing some walking probably wouldn't do any harm. Which model are you going for? I've got the KSO's and they're great.

Best of luck on PRMC by the way, smash it.
 

WelshLad91

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3 weeks until PRMC - definitely DO NOT run in them, however getting them and doing some walking probably wouldn't do any harm. Which model are you going for? I've got the KSO's and they're great.

Best of luck on PRMC by the way, smash it.
Aye just ordered some black and orange KSO's mate. Yeah i won't be doing any running in them. Will do mate, pretty close now but can't wait haha!
 

State of Mind

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Hi,

I am always interested to read this topic and thought i would throw in my opinions.

I am with the majority here that minimalist running is a positive step towards good running technique, posture and proprioception. We have had gel cushion heels that make running more comfortable made available to us but it encourages poor running technique, specifically heel striking causing achillies, muscle, ligament, tendon, fascia problems in some people.

I made a move towards minimalist shoes not long ago and stepped into a pair of New Balance trainers. They are the lightest, most proprioceptive shoe i have ever experienced. I started out walking around in them casually and for the first week i felt my ankles, soleus and foot all adapting to the change. I then started small 1/2-2 mile runs working my way up the miles giving myself chance to develop the running style. I did not want to go straight for Vibram's because changing your running style so rapidly because this can also cause problems.

My advise:

1) Invest in a pair of minimalist trainers a small 0-4mm drop. (New Balance, Vivobarefoot etc)
2) Walk in them
3) Small runs
4) Get some Vibrams and do the same

SoM
 

Eyebrows

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I'd definitely wait till after your PRMC. If you follow my advice and go completely barefoot chances are you'll get a blisters for the first few weeks as your feet toughen up, so you don't want to be running on them at PRMC.

The most recent info that I have read from the barefoot running community is that it is best not to transistion slowly by using slightly cushioned shoes or minimilist shoes. This is because you will still run with your old technique but with less cushioning- causing more damage than before.

If you lose the shoes completely all the proprioceptors in your feet get to do their job and will help you adjust your running style. One important thing to remember is to play around with your technique. Do some research on the correct style and conciously do it when running. Most people won't subconciously adopt the new style and need to work on it.
 
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