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Views on rmr

Discussion in 'RMR Section and RMR Selection' started by dewalt2001, Aug 13, 2018.

  1. dewalt2001

    dewalt2001 Active Member

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    hi trying to make a decision if I should go full time or down the rmr route, always wanted to go full time but am now considering the rmr route because I have two children, just wondering are the rmr trained to the exact standards of regulars and what’s the general view on reserves from regular personnel are they viewed as equals even tho they don’t go thro all the hardship down ctcrm? Also do rmr get given the same jobs as regulars? Thoughts on this would be appreciated and helpful to me making my decision, thanks
     
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  2. Advocado

    Advocado Royal Marines Commando

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    I know guys that have been through training with kids, one of my best mates had 4 nippers when we were training! No doubt it makes things more difficult but it is still doable. You'll also qualify for married accommodation when you pass out as a full time regular (if you're married of course) which are decent houses for the most part at a very subsidised rate.

    Okay now for the part which may seem a bit savage, just my personal opinion and no disrespect to any reservists on this forum. I personally think that only ex-regulars should be eligible for the reserves.
    Having worked with reservists on several occasions, I found it easy to tell who was an ex-regular and who wasn't. I understand that undertaking training on a part time basis over weekends comes with its own challenges especially alongside a civvie job but I just don't think it's the same as 32 weeks minimum down lympstone living and breathing the hell of training 24/7.

    I think I am slightly biased as I have had a few run ins with reservists who joined the reserves in order to boost their civvie careers as adventurous training expedition leaders. I'm only interested in guys who join the corps for the right reasons.

    Also, its difficult enough to keep skills and drills ticking over as a full time marine, skill fade is a real threat to effectiveness and if regulars are struggling to find time to keep all their skills ticking over I haven't a clue how reservists do it.
     
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  3. dewalt2001

    dewalt2001 Active Member

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    Its the being away from the kids for so long I am unsure what impact this would have on them, it wouldn’t be so bad if we could live in the sfa as would be able to go home to them every night when not busy but I know other half wouldn’t leave where we are at the minute (suffolk), would only be able to travel home weekends at the most if I was at 40 in Taunton which is closest to me, as it’s 4 hour drive not sure it would be possible to do that in the week? Would feel like I was abandoning them. Never considered rmr until now as I was of similar opinion, just weighing up all options as been wanting to join for a while now am nearly 24 feels like the clock is ticking just don’t know if I should forget the whole idea
     
  4. Ninja_Stoker

    Ninja_Stoker Admin

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    Kids are pretty resilient in the main and unless they already have profound issues, it's usually the parents that struggle more than they do with regard separation through work or personal circumstances - once the initial change settles back into a routine.

    To put things into perspective, I reckon as many as half the people we interview come from single-parent families (depending on region). They're usually pretty well-adjusted and no more disadvantaged than young people who live with both parents.

    The main things are how your partner will cope in your absence and how you will cope being away from them.

    The issue for reservists, as alluded above, is currency. They can deploy embedded within a regular service fighting unit & my perception is the RMR are a damn sight more professional than some other Reserve units however skill-fade is common and it doesn't matter how keen & knowledgeable you are, it's difficult to keep current.

    I'm aware of Reservists who did a couple of operational tours on Herrick but were not permitted to transfer to the regulars service as a trained rank. That said, they're a valuable resource and regarded by many as probably one of the most professional of the Reserve organisations, including UKSF(R).
     
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  5. dewalt2001

    dewalt2001 Active Member

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    @Ninja_Stoker what support is available to partners and children if not living near a unit if any? I have read that there are lots of other wives in same position to mix with but sure you would have to live nearer to be apart of this?
     
  6. Ninja_Stoker

    Ninja_Stoker Admin

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    Once you complete training and receive your assignment order, you can, if you wish, apply for Service Families Accommodation(SFA) if you wish to move your family.

    In the event your family does not wish to uproot, it is possible to go for short term leases of surplus SFA, if available, during term holidays, etc. If you don't move your family, you will get a Get You Home allowance (which usually equates to the cost of one or two train trips home per month). Full entitlement to Expenses and Allowances is published within JSP 752

    Whilst there are first class welfare support networks available in base areas, the day to day running of a family including childcare is the responsibility of the parents but help is at hand should it be required. Things like securing school places for children and suchlike comes under the Armed Forces Covenant.
     
  7. H01ty

    H01ty Valuable Contributor

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    Ironically it doesn’t help get them any further in that world anyway. I’m an expedition leader and overseas adventure training instructor - I’ve built it as a ‘fallback’ career after two unsuccessful attempts at RMR and RM training respectively. Despite my best efforts, reaching the Cdo Course with RMR, perhaps RM wasn’t for me or maybe I’ll give it a final push in a few years.

    Whilst the green beret and RM is heralded and rightly so within the military, an interviewer in this industry couldn’t care less about it. They want a track record of outdoor qualifications and independent travel experience. Whether that comes from a clean-cut former bootneck or a hairy hippy in orange trousers doesn’t particularly matter as long as you’re safe and professional on the hill, in the jungle etc. Actually met more former Marines trying to hide it in this industry than trying to utilise it.
     
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  8. ThreadpigeonsAlpha

    ThreadpigeonsAlpha Royal Marines Commando

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    If you are in full time education, or self employment or slightly older, I would reccomend RMR.
    If you aren’t, I would suggest you look at Regular RM.

    Everything has pretty much been covered from the benefits and welfare packages. Keep us updated with your choice and progress.