'Walts' cannot stay away.

DutyWretch

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Ahhhh the Walts.

I’ve met more than one since becoming civvy scum.

First was a security guard who looked after the contractors car park while I was working on the new Queensferry Crossing project roughly 2015.

My boss had told him I was an ex Bootneck (I never bring this up in conversation. Ever) and of course, that night after my shift on route to jump in my car, he stopped me and asked me if I had ‘really been a Marine’. I gave my usual answer ‘yes mate, but it was a long time ago now’

Then he couldn’t help but tell me he had been one too!

‘Nice one mate’ says I ‘what unit were you at and when?’

‘I was with the fourty twos in Plymouth...’ he began, and I immediately switched off and chuckled inwardly.

I ended the convo by letting him know that ‘four two’ was my last posting and that I’d never heard it called the 42’s. See ya later Bell*nd.


I had an absolute cracker only last month.

I’m working on a huge offshore vessel, one of the most important jobs aboard these things is the Crane operator. He’s effectively, the Bosun, and crane operator and most senior member of the marine deck crew aboard.

My job is on deck as project crew, so I need to have a good working relationship with this guy. And so we worked quite closely for the 3 weeks.

On the last day before I was due off, we are sitting at breakfast (which happens to be dinner as I’m nightshift) and he asks me if I was in the Marines? (Again I had no reason to mention it, but someone else had obviously seen it on my CV as I’d been asked by a few of the other project lads)

‘Yes mate, it was a while ago now though’ says I.

‘Oh right!’ He begins, ‘I was going to join the Marines too,

It was a choice between going the merchant navy or the Marines, if I didn’t get in the ‘Merch I was would’ve joined...

A group of us were selected to do a two week course which basically qualified us as Marines, it was condensed due to time constraints’


I sh*t you not, that was his exact statement.

I don’t like to embarrass people, especially as a) it was in a public place with other colleagues present, b) I don’t really give a monkeys what fantasies grown men have, and fabricate to make them feel better or whatever,

So I just made some comment about how ‘it’s strange the MOD aren’t all over that condensed course, as I’m sure it’s a lot more cost effective than the 8 months it took for me to ‘qualify’ and then said my goodbyes and see ya nevers.

I don’t understand them and never will, it’s sad and funny and infuriating all at once.

One thing I see a lot of on LinkedIn these days is ‘former potential Royal Marine’ and ‘former Royal Marines recruit’ as though dipping out or failing is some kind of achievement worth mentioning, on what is essentially your online cv.

Some great stories here. They certainly provide a good laugh.
 

DutyWretch

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It's pretty mental how much some foreigners praise and herald UK forces.

I was leading an expedition in Ecuador last summer and my group crossed paths with a group led by a former RM officer. Conversation flowed and I told him I'd been a nod and was rejoining, he spun some Herrick dits etc etc. Anyway, this all came to the knowledge of the local Ecuadorian staff, one of whom was in absolute speechless amazement.

Turned out he was one of these "reenactors"/airsofters. He'd done some service in Ecuador but wasn't quite satisfied and seemed to have dedicated every penny he earned to dressing like a bootneck-UKSF hybrid. Crye rig, an authentic WW2 Commando Dagger he'd paid loads to ship over, the full shebang. He took us to one side one night and begged us to tell him exactly which plate carrier the SBS currently use, to which we were obviously clueless!

In the end the former Officer gave him a Commando Flash as a gift and we both received Ecuador military patches from our new pal as a parting gift ourselves.

He's probably at some South American airsoft meet this very moment with Flashes sewn on!

Bet you spun him some toe curling training dit’s while you were at it! You howler ;)
 

thirdtry

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Bet you spun him some toe curling training dit’s while you were at it! You howler ;)
Nothing impresses South American airsofters more than a description of a gorse bush and diamond copse -banghead-

Jokes aside I'm always swift to direct conversation away from anything to do with training if it comes up, which it occasionally does as a result of being an 18-month chunk of my CV (one manager tells someone and suddenly an entire staff team find out). Feels extremely waltish to even talk about having been a nod, very much have to make a point that it is not being "in the Marines" as people seem to think. All gets a bit embarrassing and have to start stomping out the conversation and changing the subject, usually possible by spinning a story about something else since then working in the adventure/travel sector.
 

DutyWretch

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Nothing impresses South American airsofters more than a description of a gorse bush and diamond copse -banghead-

Jokes aside I'm always swift to direct conversation away from anything to do with training if it comes up, which it occasionally does as a result of being an 18-month chunk of my CV (one manager tells someone and suddenly an entire staff team find out). Feels extremely waltish to even talk about having been a nod, very much have to make a point that it is not being "in the Marines" as people seem to think. All gets a bit embarrassing and have to start stomping out the conversation and changing the subject, usually possible by spinning a story about something else since then working in the adventure/travel sector.
Im sure you do mate I’m just joking.

In fact if you made it past week 15 (according to my RCT troop sgt) you’re technically qualified to call yourself a Marine regardless of wether you end up passing out...

Not sure wether I agree, but it’s an achievement that one should certainly be proud of regardless.

Always be humble and you can’t go wrong.

I heard a good one about myself a few years ago.

My Mrs’ ex husband was asking our mutual friends about me (bearing in mind this was about 3 years after we’d got together)

And the obviously bitter ex said to our mutual friend; ‘I bet he’s always going on about the Marines though!’

To which the guy brilliantly replied; ‘he has literally never mentioned it’

Bootnecks have a reputation as quiet professionals. Always important to uphold the tradition.
 

thirdtry

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Im sure you do mate I’m just joking.

In fact if you made it past week 15 (according to my RCT troop sgt) you’re technically qualified to call yourself a Marine regardless of wether you end up passing out...

Not sure wether I agree, but it’s an achievement that one should certainly be proud of regardless.

Always be humble and you can’t go wrong.

I heard a good one about myself a few years ago.

My Mrs’ ex husband was asking our mutual friends about me (bearing in mind this was about 3 years after we’d got together)

And the obviously bitter ex said to our mutual friend; ‘I bet he’s always going on about the Marines though!’

To which the guy brilliantly replied; ‘he has literally never mentioned it’

Bootnecks have a reputation as quiet professionals. Always important to uphold the tradition.
Suppose that first point is a follow on from how its seen in the rest of the forces. The passing out parade for most of the army (not infantry) is Week 14 and they become a 'trained rank' at the end of Phase 1 despite often having much longer Phase 2 courses after. Possibly also the same for RN passing out of Raleigh? So in some ways the RM and infantry are unique that the end of Phase 2 marks their passing out.

The worst "training walt" thing is the Veterans Badge that gets sent out. Surely a Veteran should be a title for someone with Operational time under their belt
 

Caversham

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Ahhhh the Walts.

I’ve met more than one since becoming civvy scum.

First was a security guard who looked after the contractors car park while I was working on the new Queensferry Crossing project roughly 2015.

My boss had told him I was an ex Bootneck (I never bring this up in conversation. Ever) and of course, that night after my shift on route to jump in my car, he stopped me and asked me if I had ‘really been a Marine’. I gave my usual answer ‘yes mate, but it was a long time ago now’

Then he couldn’t help but tell me he had been one too!

‘Nice one mate’ says I ‘what unit were you at and when?’

‘I was with the fourty twos in Plymouth...’ he began, and I immediately switched off and chuckled inwardly.

I ended the convo by letting him know that ‘four two’ was my last posting and that I’d never heard it called the 42’s. See ya later Bell*nd.


I had an absolute cracker only last month.

I’m working on a huge offshore vessel, one of the most important jobs aboard these things is the Crane operator. He’s effectively, the Bosun, and crane operator and most senior member of the marine deck crew aboard.

My job is on deck as project crew, so I need to have a good working relationship with this guy. And so we worked quite closely for the 3 weeks.

On the last day before I was due off, we are sitting at breakfast (which happens to be dinner as I’m nightshift) and he asks me if I was in the Marines? (Again I had no reason to mention it, but someone else had obviously seen it on my CV as I’d been asked by a few of the other project lads)

‘Yes mate, it was a while ago now though’ says I.

‘Oh right!’ He begins, ‘I was going to join the Marines too,

It was a choice between going the merchant navy or the Marines, if I didn’t get in the ‘Merch I was would’ve joined...

A group of us were selected to do a two week course which basically qualified us as Marines, it was condensed due to time constraints’


I sh*t you not, that was his exact statement.

I don’t like to embarrass people, especially as a) it was in a public place with other colleagues present, b) I don’t really give a monkeys what fantasies grown men have, and fabricate to make them feel better or whatever,

So I just made some comment about how ‘it’s strange the MOD aren’t all over that condensed course, as I’m sure it’s a lot more cost effective than the 8 months it took for me to ‘qualify’ and then said my goodbyes and see ya nevers.

I don’t understand them and never will, it’s sad and funny and infuriating all at once.

One thing I see a lot of on LinkedIn these days is ‘former potential Royal Marine’ and ‘former Royal Marines recruit’ as though dipping out or failing is some kind of achievement worth mentioning, on what is essentially your online cv.

Some great stories here. They certainly provide a good laugh.
The one thing that always catches them out is to ask, what Troop were you in, whats your number and what’s the name of your DL.
What they always forget is the Corps is a very small organisation and it’s relatively easy to find out if someone is walting.

The biggest one I am aware of was a guy who was the branch secretary and standard bearer of an RBL branch in the north west. He claimed that he was a former Marine SNCO, badged in shaker boats and was awarded the MM in the Falklands in 82. He was outed by a serving WO1, who found himself fighting for his professional integrity when the *text deleted* instructed solicitors to persue a claim of slander and wanting damages.

In summary, he falsified the SAMA role of those who took part in the conflict, by taking the name of a SNCO who later died.
Took the official number of a recruit who had been discharged as unsuitable.
Awarded himself an MM which was not shown in the gazette.
Claimed he was SB, SNCO and a PW which according to his number meant that he would have passed out a month or so before the conflict started.
Posted photographs claiming that they were of him during the war, which were later proved to be false, when the real person popped up and outed him.
It took the combined weight of the WO1, the SBSA who had no record of him ever being badged. CTC who had no record of him ever being there to convince the RBL that he was a WALT and asked him to resign. Even his wife was totally taken in by him, as well as former colleagues of him.
It turned out he had been a 3 badge stoker in the RN and had been nowhere near the FI.

Alan
 

Saracen1

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Suppose that first point is a follow on from how its seen in the rest of the forces. The passing out parade for most of the army (not infantry) is Week 14 and they become a 'trained rank' at the end of Phase 1 despite often having much longer Phase 2 courses after. Possibly also the same for RN passing out of Raleigh? So in some ways the RM and infantry are unique that the end of Phase 2 marks their passing out.

The worst "training walt" thing is the Veterans Badge that gets sent out. Surely a Veteran should be a title for someone with Operational time under their belt
I am gobsmacked at the Veterans Badge being sent out.

My son received his today with a certificate of thanks for his service in the UK Armed Forces and a record of service which states his rank as Royal Marine.

He was on ROP in July, got injured during week 2, MD’d in week 3 and because it was an MD given a week added on to his service / pay, therefore technically four weeks as a trainee.

I was proud to wear mine at appropriate events after RFA Service, including the South Atlantic ‘82, but not so sure now I know they are handed out like sweets!
 

Ninja_Stoker

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Reading through this thread it's apparent that many recruits who pass selection for the Royal Marines but don't reach Kings Squad still think it worth mentioning on their CV.

The trouble is a fair few go on to embellish their service history which, to me, is insulting to trained ranks and in the States, it is an offence and considered stolen valour.

Over the years we've bubbled quite a few chimps who have benefitted from making false claims and in one case, secured their dismissal from their civilian job due to fraudulent claims regarding their service qualifications.
 

Chelonian

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I have mixed feelings about the Veterans' Badge. As a mark of service it can only work if it is completely inclusive. Sadly, some Recruits die during RT. Arguably, in military service one accepts the liability of being in harm's way, regardless of whether it actually happens.

As an aside, during the Great War personnel who were medically discharged were issued with a Silver War Badge which could be worn on a civilian jacket. At a time when not being in uniform could attract adverse comment the badges indicated that the bearer had served his or her country.
These badges—more commonly known as Silver Wound Badges—were uniquely numbered and registered to the recipient. The badges were issued regardless of whether the medical discharge was because of, say, flat feet or multiple loss of limbs.

My grandfather's SWB:

SWB.jpg
 

Ninja_Stoker

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I have mixed feelings about the Veterans' Badge. As a mark of service it can only work if it is completely inclusive. Sadly, some Recruits die during RT. Arguably, in military service one accepts the liability of being in harm's way, regardless of whether it actually happens.

As an aside, during the Great War personnel who were medically discharged were issued with a Silver War Badge which could be worn on a civilian jacket. At a time when not being in uniform could attract adverse comment the badges indicated that the bearer had served his or her country.
These badges—more commonly known as Silver Wound Badges—were uniquely numbered and registered to the recipient. The badges were issued regardless of whether the medical discharge was because of, say, flat feet or multiple loss of limbs.

My grandfather's SWB:

SWB.jpg
Eligibility for SSAFA assistance requires just one day's paid service in any arm or the regular or reserve armed forces.

Clearly there needs to be a minimum time served to qualify for assistance from service charities, but I must admit I was unaware a veterans lapel badge was given to former recruits, thus classifying recruits as military veterans. It was interesting to hear of the WW1 'service rendered' badge, which was effectively a fore-runner, something else I was unaware of.

Ultimately, there has to be a line drawn somewhere and personnel on the untrained strength should morally be entitled to the same benefits.

The same thing happens with campaign medals which can be earned for a single 30 day visit to an area of conflict, hundreds of miles distant from the actual combat operations. Equally a person deployed operationally, right at the sharp end on multiple tours, earns the same recognition. WW2 is a good example, inasmuch as many people earned campaign medals without ever hearing a shot fired in anger, contrary to the image created in the tuppeny blood Commando comic books.

The issue, for me, is not so much the tall tales of imagined daring-do, but those who make money out of falsely claiming their military experience and benefit from it.
 

Chelonian

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The same thing happens with campaign medals which can be earned for a single 30 day visit to an area of conflict, hundreds of miles distant from the actual combat operations.
Another anomaly mentioned on this forum by a well known personality is that some SF operators failed to qualify for service campaign medals because their numerous operational deployments in theatre were for short periods of time.
 

DutyWretch

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Why don’t I have a ‘veterans badge’? (Not that I’d ever have occasion to wear it) I seem to have missed out on a lot of that stuff. Never received a Gucci ISAF medal after Herrick 9 either.



Eligibility for SSAFA assistance requires just one day's paid service in any arm or the regular or reserve armed forces.

Clearly there needs to be a minimum time served to qualify for assistance from service charities, but I must admit I was unaware a veterans lapel badge was given to former recruits, thus classifying recruits as military veterans. It was interesting to hear of the WW1 'service rendered' badge, which was effectively a fore-runner, something else I was unaware of.

Ultimately, there has to be a line drawn somewhere and personnel on the untrained strength should morally be entitled to the same benefits.

The same thing happens with campaign medals which can be earned for a single 30 day visit to an area of conflict, hundreds of miles distant from the actual combat operations. Equally a person deployed operationally, right at the sharp end on multiple tours, earns the same recognition. WW2 is a good example, inasmuch as many people earned campaign medals without ever hearing a shot fired in anger, contrary to the image created in the tuppeny blood Commando comic books.

The issue, for me, is not so much the tall tales of imagined daring-do, but those who make money out of falsely claiming their military experience and benefit from it.

Can’t agree more with this statement.

One thing that really stuck in mine (and a lot of other lads) minds, was that after our tour, which involved contact with the enemy at least every other day from pot shots at our PB to CQB, resulting in the loss of two of my section, we were issued the same medal as the Naafi warriors at Bastion and Kandahar.

It’s not really a big deal, and as we are a humble lot, it doesn’t get much mention. But I think the Americans have got the right idea, with that ‘patch’ (looks like a musket worn on the chest) that denotes they’ve been under enemy small arms fire.

Not to denigrate from any service, as without the more numerous support forces, infantry units simply couldn’t operate. But I think it’s fair to separate service in the rear from service right at the sharp end.


But I suppose there is the old argument Churchill used to explain the relative lack of medals for courage and service issued to para and commandos during WW2; ‘they’re expected to be courageous by definition’

Any thoughts?
 

Chelonian

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Why don’t I have a ‘veterans badge’? (Not that I’d ever have occasion to wear it) I seem to have missed out on a lot of that stuff. Never received a Gucci ISAF medal after Herrick 9 either.

You can also check and apply for any medal to which you might be entitled. My grandfather (the one with the SWB) was killed on Home Guard Service in the 1940s and entitled to The Defence Medal 1939-1945. I applied to the Army Medal Office fifty years after his death and it was sent to me.

TDM.jpeg
 

ThreadpigeonsAlpha

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Why don’t I have a ‘veterans badge’? (Not that I’d ever have occasion to wear it) I seem to have missed out on a lot of that stuff. Never received a Gucci ISAF medal after Herrick 9 either.






Can’t agree more with this statement.

One thing that really stuck in mine (and a lot of other lads) minds, was that after our tour, which involved contact with the enemy at least every other day from pot shots at our PB to CQB, resulting in the loss of two of my section, we were issued the same medal as the Naafi warriors at Bastion and Kandahar.

It’s not really a big deal, and as we are a humble lot, it doesn’t get much mention. But I think the Americans have got the right idea, with that ‘patch’ (looks like a musket worn on the chest) that denotes they’ve been under enemy small arms fire.

Not to denigrate from any service, as without the more numerous support forces, infantry units simply couldn’t operate. But I think it’s fair to separate service in the rear from service right at the sharp end.


But I suppose there is the old argument Churchill used to explain the relative lack of medals for courage and service issued to para and commandos during WW2; ‘they’re expected to be courageous by definition’

Any thoughts?
I find it annoying that the bootnecks involved in jugroom fort never got awarded medals, just the pilots.
 

DutyWretch

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The one thing that always catches them out is to ask, what Troop were you in, whats your number and what’s the name of your DL.
What they always forget is the Corps is a very small organisation and it’s relatively easy to find out if someone is walting.

The biggest one I am aware of was a guy who was the branch secretary and standard bearer of an RBL branch in the north west. He claimed that he was a former Marine SNCO, badged in shaker boats and was awarded the MM in the Falklands in 82. He was outed by a serving WO1, who found himself fighting for his professional integrity when the *text deleted* instructed solicitors to persue a claim of slander and wanting damages.

In summary, he falsified the SAMA role of those who took part in the conflict, by taking the name of a SNCO who later died.
Took the official number of a recruit who had been discharged as unsuitable.
Awarded himself an MM which was not shown in the gazette.
Claimed he was SB, SNCO and a PW which according to his number meant that he would have passed out a month or so before the conflict started.
Posted photographs claiming that they were of him during the war, which were later proved to be false, when the real person popped up and outed him.
It took the combined weight of the WO1, the SBSA who had no record of him ever being badged. CTC who had no record of him ever being there to convince the RBL that he was a WALT and asked him to resign. Even his wife was totally taken in by him, as well as former colleagues of him.
It turned out he had been a 3 badge stoker in the RN and had been nowhere near the FI.

Alan
I remember that screamer.

OAMAAM went after him big time aswell if I recall correctly.

If they’re just blagging to trap a chick or airsofters I don’t really care.

But if you’re using it to attain positions of authority, cash, or for ‘war baby’ sympathy then I start getting angry.

One of my Mrs friends’ husband was always putting up ‘sympathy statuses’ on Facebook around November 5th, about how ‘it’s a celebration for everyone else, but for me it’s a time of misery and fear’
Basically he was saying the fireworks triggered his severe PTSD.

Me and Mrs Wretch would always laugh about it, and I joked he’d probably been so far behind the front line he’d had to send his mail forward etc etc


Anyway he ended up getting exposed by those weirdo Walt hunters, as a 1x prominent bloater who had never been anywhere near any kind of enemy engagement, and had spent his time as a galley rocket or something.

He’d even been heavily involved with the invictus games and met (former) prince Harry etc etc.

Got publicly ruined, lost job, relationship breakdown the lot.


Snigger snigger
 

Chelonian

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Many years ago another RBL standard bearer was outed in Dartmouth by his embittered ex-wife.
It caused a significant family rift and one of the man's grandchildren approached a local newspaper with 'evidence' that he had served aboard a RN warship in the South Atlantic in 1982 as he claimed rather than slopping food onto a tray in Pompey as his ex-missus alleged.

The grandchild was photographed holding a spent Argentine .50 cal cartridge which had allegedly been gifted to her grandfather as "a mark of respect" by a Royal Marine who had cleared an enemy HMG nest and pinched some spent brass as souvenirs. This was the family legend anyway.
Problem was that the headstamp on the cartridge included the letters RG which indicated it was British and manufactured by Royal Ordnance Factory Radway Green. The other obvious clue was that the cartridge was date stamped 1990. -banghead-

Perhaps a sad tale in some respects but the bloke had a reputation for belittling others and enforcing 'standards' in a bullying manner within his RBL branch so he wasn't much missed when he quietly resigned.
 

Duality

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My old dad was on HMS Jamaica during WW2 (He's very old). In all the years I've been on this planet, he's spoke very little about his naval career. I only know little bits when he gave me his service record.
Anyway, he used to go to the local RBL and sit doing his crossword and have a beer. The last time he was in - a few years ago now, a guy was telling war stories about being on the Jamaica and all the terrible things he'd seen. At that point, dad stood up, walked over to him and told him he was a liar. The guy took offence, called my dad for everything. He then told him 'I know you're a liar. I can prove I was on the Jamaica, can you?' The guy scuttled off. My dad never went back in. He said the place was full of them.
 

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My old dad was on HMS Jamaica during WW2 (He's very old). In all the years I've been on this planet, he's spoke very little about his naval career. I only know little bits when he gave me his service record.
Anyway, he used to go to the local RBL and sit doing his crossword and have a beer. The last time he was in - a few years ago now, a guy was telling war stories about being on the Jamaica and all the terrible things he'd seen. At that point, dad stood up, walked over to him and told him he was a liar. The guy took offence, called my dad for everything. He then told him 'I know you're a liar. I can prove I was on the Jamaica, can you?' The guy scuttled off. My dad never went back in. He said the place was full of them.
Yep, I think a fair few people embellish their career credentials. Usually this is just to impress the children or grandchildren. For example, as declared elsewhere my granddad was a Royal Marine & must've taken out a whole battalion of the SS according to the tales of his exploits. Awesome bloke.

It was only after he died, I discovered he was actually a musician, so can only presume he was a terribly bad one to have taken out that many Germans :)
 

Chelonian

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It was only after he died, I discovered he was actually a musician, so can only presume he was a terribly bad one to have taken out that many Germans :)
When I was a small boy my pa had me convinced that his scar from an appendix op had actually been inflicted by a Jap bayonet. :)

A bar fly of my acquaintance tells the women he errm... encounters that his scars caused by hip replacement surgery were inflicted by a great white shark. Shameless but also amusing.
 

Duality

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Totally get it but my old man has said almost nothing about his naval life. I've only seen a couple of photos as it was so long ago but I was impressed with his documents when I saw them. I never ask about it because I get the feeling he doesn't want to talk about it.
 
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