Weight of logs in training.

Anthony_H

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What is the weight of the logs used in the RM circuits. One of the things I struggled with on rmad was log carries above the head and duck walking with the weight. So started to use a kettle bell in this style. Just wanted work out the rough weight per person so I can try and get near to simulating the weight.
 

Jbc

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They're heavy. I could give you a breakdown of every item of kit, every phys session, every 'extra phys' and every lesson plan but that would defy the point.

A lot to be Said for prior planning and prep but equally the boot neck spirit of 'crack on regardless' shouldn't be underestimated. Whatever the weight, distance, task, time of day or night be prepared to be dry unprepared!
 

VTomasi

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The big logs are heavy. Really rather heavy.
 

Anthony_H

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I was looking at the seal videos on YouTube, and seen they was using the medicine ball to simulate his portion of the log and bands for hip strengthening. So thought I would extend this too help build my shoulder strength and build lower leg strength by doing duck walks too. When I was on the logs on rmad and i was put on the front I physically could not get the log above my head. Like I was saying in my other thread im struggling to do anything that lifts weight above my head. I have started following some mobility drills as suggested. I know the will to crack on goes for alot, but if can't lift the weight it would be stupid of me not to work on it. I have had my fair share of injuries in the shoulders too, and it seems to be what goes first on press Ups and pull Ups etc. I had bike accident about 6 years ago and bruised up my left shoulder, although everything was fine and only rest was prescribed I couldn't use my arm for for a good While. Coincidentally it's my left shoulder that is the worse, poor flexibility and weak, It's the side to drop out first on press ups, bench press, shoulder press etc basically anything that recruits the shoulders.
 

Red Bull

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I think JBC makes a good point.

They're not going to be heavy enough for you not to be able to lift them, but you WILL struggle to complete any task. It's all about progressive overload.

As he said, just 'crack on'.

Edit: after reading second post. Why don't you try getting in the gym and building up some shoulder strength. Can't hurt. Overhead press etc
 

Anthony_H

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Edit: after reading second post. Why don't you try getting in the gym and building up some shoulder strength. Can't hurt. Overhead press etc
I have been doing, but I think it would be better to ad to something functional. Hence using the kettlebell, hold it above my head and duck walk doing the drills I couldn't do. I can increase the weight as I go along that way so I will be able to do it.
 

MacheteMeetsBiscuit

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Why not just go with a weight which is heavy to you, but comfortable enough to carry so you won't drop it on your head and leave a mess worthy of some dark backpages of the perverted internet?

Then build it up from there so you're constantly getting stronger. At the end of the day, every recruit will be in the same position so no doubt you'll be at an advantage if you've done some build-up with pretty much any weight!
 

Anthony_H

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Why not just go with a weight which is heavy to you, but comfortable enough to carry so you won't drop it on your head and leave a mess worthy of some dark backpages of the perverted internet?

Then build it up from there so you're constantly getting stronger. At the end of the day, every recruit will be in the same position so no doubt you'll be at an advantage if you've done some build-up with pretty much any weight!
Well the Kettle bells go up to 20KG in the gym, I just wanted to know a rough idea what the weight I'm aiming for and if 20kg is enough to build to then work for the endurance side of it.
 

MacheteMeetsBiscuit

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I know the logs used at BUD/S are roughly 250lb if that makes any difference to you. Maybe divide that by the number of guys on a log and see what you're left with. An unaltered log can only weigh so much.
 
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Breaking this down far to much, weather or not the weight is enough for you to get a training effect from it depends on how strong you are, try it and see, if it?s tough but do-able great if not find something else.

No one size fits all with anything.

Stokey
 

Anthony_H

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I know the logs used at BUD/S are roughly 250lb if that makes any difference to you. Maybe divide that by the number of guys on a log and see what you're left with. An unaltered log can only weigh so much.
Just on a Buds training site now looking at there suggestions to preparing for logs. There was 5 of us so 22 KG, looks as though the Kettle Bell should do it. Don't think it helped being taller, I was at the front at first, but the I was moved to the middle as I just couldn't hold it. I have been way to naive to think I could go from 6 or so years of nothing atall to being able to just get back onto training and do the things a used to really.
 
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