What do officers actually do

Discussion in 'RM Officer questions' started by 400th_FakeMcNab, May 18, 2016.

  1. 400th_FakeMcNab

    400th_FakeMcNab New Member

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    I know there are mixed opinions about officers, especially from those who are serving under one, but I like to hear mixed down to earth opinions.

    When I try to find out about what officers do all I get, either from the AFCO or the RM website, is that officers basically lead and manage a team of marines and have to lead them and coordinate them and that no two days are the same blah blah. Although that may be true it means that I can only find out so much from there. Also when I try to find out what they do as a wider role i'm just told the same and that they also do humanitarian missions blah blah blah (to make it sound as I won't always be killing people). Although I doubt the people at the AFCO are going to tell me that i'm going to spend my days doing simple boring paperwork 24/7 I guess I would be doing some. But that's the problem I just don't know what i'd actually be doing.

    Say there are no wars going on, no deployment for royal marines or anyone, what are the officers doing then? Are they just sitting about, will they go training with their troop or different people, would they have to go on this training or is it voluntary for everyone, what if there is no training are they just sitting about at a desk doing nothing or just doing admin type stuff?

    That gets me onto another thing that i just don't know, how much admin deskwork type stuff would I actually have to do as an officer? What would my day actually be like and I know someone will tell me about how no two days are the same, well can't you make up an average boring day for an officer and tell me because I am clueless.

    This looks a bit long to check for spelling errors but hey ho just try and read it and if you do manage to read it it will probably sound stupid anyway but hey ho i'm just trying to make the best decision for me.
     
  2. Pock

    Pock Royal Marines Commando

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  3. Pock

    Pock Royal Marines Commando

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    Haha, as soon as I saw the thread title I knew who would best answer it.
     
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  4. Ninja_Stoker

    Ninja_Stoker Careers Adviser

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    After the caviar tirade and witty retorts, the simple response is: 'What would you like to think Officers actually do, day to day, when not actually operationally involved, on the ground, at the sharp end?'

    Would it be appropriate, perhaps, to antagonise a response from the local populace of an occupied country for a scuffle? Or would it be more prudent to forge links whilst maintaining the operational capability and welfare of your troop?

    The clue is in the origin of the word 'officer'.
     
  5. PotentialToff

    PotentialToff Member

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    I recently went to Faslane with a group of potential RMYO and we spoke with several serving RM Officers at 43 Commando and sat through multiple presentations.

    It is true the 'hands on' specialisations are for the recruit level only, or officers in these roles are exceptionally rare (such as maritime sniper, you seen that role, firing on a speedboats engine from a helicopter!), it does become apparent that the higher up the tree you go the more administrative duty you take on. For example, one of the officers (he was a Captain) we were speaking with had been busy for the last month booking an exercise in the US for his men. This involved a lot of 'is everyone's passport in date and do they have their VISA's and security clearance in place' and 'do we have the correct clearance to get our weapons in to the US then back again'.

    However, every officer had an awesome story about their careers, also these are extremely fit individuals who have themselves in top physical condition so they will train daily, and another important things is officers get to re-specialise every two years (unless their current specialisation is running at a personnel deficit) and at recruit level it is rare to get to re-specialise.

    If you make it all the way through as an officer everyone calls you ‘Boss’.
     
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  6. Ninja_Stoker

    Ninja_Stoker Careers Adviser

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    To be honest, door gunners/snipers are other ranks rather than officers. Officers may occasionally have a one-off opportunity to undertake a bit of sharp-shooting, but that isn't a role they would undertake day to day. Officers deploy snipers, they are not sniper trained in the main. Opportunities such as that are rare for Officers.

    With regard specialisations, most Other Rank SQ/TQs also have a two year return of service before the individual may change specialisation. It is fairly common for Other Ranks to undertake more than one SQ/TQ.
     
  7. ThreadpigeonsAlpha

    ThreadpigeonsAlpha Royal Marines Commando

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    Caviar anyone?


    All jokes aside, Officers are your Boss and they have a job to do and a lot of them do it very well.
     
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  8. Rover

    Rover Moderator

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    So what are the functions of an officer?:confused:

    As a leader the following are to be expected;

    P Planning

    O Organisation

    C Control

    S Support

    I information

    E Evaluation

    The following qualities as a leader are also expected;o_O

    Judgement. Understanding. Bearing. Willpower. Integrity. Courage. Knowledge.

    Exactly the same as to be expected from any NCO or Marine. ;)

    The following is to give an example of one officer’s career.


    Sir David Andrew Capewell Lt Gen RM

    Military career.

    Capewell was commissioned into the Royal Marines in 1979, holding a special short-service commission. He was confirmed in the rank of lieutenant on 1 September 1983 (seniority from 1 February), and was transferred to a full career commission on 29 October 1985 (seniority from 1 February 1983).

    As a junior officer he served in Northern Ireland, Zimbabwe and South Africa. He was promoted to major on 31 December 1994. He became Chief of Staff of 3 Commando Brigade in 1998. He was promoted to colonel on 31 December 1999 and appointed Commanding Officer of 40 Commando in March 2000. In January 2002, he was appointed Chief of Staff, UK Joint Force Headquarters, in which role he served as Chief of Operations and Intelligence to the British Commander for the invasion of Iraq. He was appointed OBE in the 2002 Birthday Honours for service in Northern Ireland and Afghanistan.

    Capewell went on to be British Liaison Officer to the Joint Chiefs of Staff in the United States in 2004, and was promoted to brigadier on 18 October 2004. He became Assistant Chief of Staff (Operations) at Permanent Joint Headquarters in May 2005 and Commander of 3 Commando Brigade in June 2007. Promoted to major-general on 6 May 2008 on his appointment as Deputy Commander NATO Rapid Deployable Italian Corps, he became Assistant Chief of the Defence Staff (Operations) at the Ministry of Defence in August 2010 and Chief of Joint Operations at Permanent Joint Headquarters in December 2011, with the rank of lieutenant-general from 13 December.

    Capewell was appointed Knight Commander of the Order of the Bath (KCB) in the 2014 New Year Honours for commanding UK Global Operations during a period of unprecedented volatility.

    A senior officer who when Bde Commander greeted every Bootneck with " okay Royal " when returning a salute:)
     
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