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Whats Life like as a Royal Marine once you have a specialisation?

Discussion in 'Introductions & Welcome to the Royal Marines Site' started by Leon439, Jun 19, 2019.

  1. Johnny_Anonie

    Johnny_Anonie Moderator

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    The wire has never been so safe.
     
  2. Chelonian

    Chelonian Moderator

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    My neighbour who is long retired served a full Police career starting in 1971. His surname? Dixon.

    Me: "No offence intended but was your surname ever a handicap?"
    Him: "What do you think? First time I gave evidence in court one of the clerks had an attack of the giggles."
     
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  3. Corvo50

    Corvo50 Royal Marines Commando

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    For me the Police Force and Fire Service have always been two jobs I would leave the Corp for in a heartbeat. How strict are the police on cautions etc? . . . . Not me by the way, just erm asking for a friend ;)
     
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  4. sharpe

    sharpe Member

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    I’ll stand to be corrected but you, err your friend would be subject to same vetting as rm for criminal records and security. I’d imagine perhaps more enhanced on financial vetting, they don’t like arrears, defaults etc. Best policy is be totally open about everything and offer an explanation of what, why etc than let them discover it and assume there’s an attempt to conceal things
     
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  5. Corvo50

    Corvo50 Royal Marines Commando

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    Fair enough, wasn’t sure if as soon as something minor flagged up from years ago it would be a instant rejection etc. Is the dit about needing a degree to join the police in the future true?
     
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  6. sharpe

    sharpe Member

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    We need the plod version of ninja for that one I’m afraid! I think it’s not a university degree you need as such but a degree in policing. you need to have part of it pre joining then during what was your 2 year probation is where you complete it.
     
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  7. Johnny_Anonie

    Johnny_Anonie Moderator

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    Convictions, cautions and fixed penalty notices (road traffic and recordable offences, such as disorder and alcohol related offences) will NOT necessarily preclude anyone from appointment with the Police but you’d need to check this with your chosen force.

    It will depend on the nature and circumstances of the offence.
    Factors that are taken into consideration before a decision is made include the age of the applicant at the time of the offence, years lapsed since & obviously the offence itself.

    Any offence committed as an adult, (i.e. aged 17 years and over), which involves elements of dishonesty, corruption, serious violence or injury, serious involvement with drugs or abuse of children, substantial financial gain or serious loss to anyone is an automatic rejection.

    Sorry again mods for going a tad off topic!
     
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  8. ThreadpigeonsAlpha

    ThreadpigeonsAlpha Royal Marines Commando

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    Don’t be so sure about that. I have mates in both.
    Both have MAJOR downsides. The Police in certain areas are suffering so badly, bad shift patterns, undermanning, poor training, no support, lack of teamwork and full of *text deleted**text deleted**text deleted**text deleted*, jobsworth wannabes, and people that hit diversity quotas.

    The fire service are getting smashed more on social work style stuff, and it’s less about rescuing people and more about putting up smoke Detectors and hand rails for OAPs. And full of diversity crap, poor training.

    Both hammered by poor management, poor training, lack of understanding of the frontline role, horrendous Office politics and full of support staff Constantly justifying their jobs, and bright idea fairies coming up with retarded ideas while the politicians use them as a political football. And on many areas, the Heirarchy are trying to utilise them as social workers and paramedics, with half the training, and no extra pay, to make up for the horrendously unstaffed and badly managed Social Care sector and NHS.

    The police aren’t too bothered about cautions, depends how serious but you might want to grab some camcream when you leave the Corps.
     
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  9. ThreadpigeonsAlpha

    ThreadpigeonsAlpha Royal Marines Commando

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    No. It’s once again poor press. It’s the “civvie” qualification as you learn on the job.
    It’s basically another justification for certain admin jobs and more money wasted for a bit of paper that just says you
    Can do your job.
    You will basically do your probation/job and write lots of fancy statements and other evidence to show how amazing and good you are.

    90% of it is made up crap. It’s just a big story about how wonderful you are and ran around and did all the roles at a job.


    It’s just paper justification. You can be a sh!t police officer but write some good evidence and pass just the same.
     
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  10. ThreadpigeonsAlpha

    ThreadpigeonsAlpha Royal Marines Commando

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    Yep! They are too busy checking emails and replying to crap and trudging through admin and poor workflow systems and management.

    Whenever I think back to the Corps and miss it, I always remember sitting around waiting for a detail, and if someone asked to go do something, we got told to wait, while the hierarchy when through emails.

    Or a Classic was to “get the weapons out, take them to the grits and clean them” and come back at X o’clock....... which with Jeremy Kyle being cancelled, god knows what the lads would do!
     
  11. sharpe

    sharpe Member

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    @ThreadpigeonsAlpha I’ve always loved your input, bold and honest. My son is just starting out on rt next month. If I can help on the police front lease pm me
     
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  12. Corvo50

    Corvo50 Royal Marines Commando

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    The old is the grass greener on the other side
     
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  13. blindman3004

    blindman3004 Member

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    I work for the OU and was Special for the Met. The OU was bidding to provide apprenticeships but lost out unfortunately! (I would of been on this team!). By 2020 the entry requirements for joining the Police will change. For entrants who do not have a degree, during training they will study for a policing degree during their probation. However In order to meet to entry requirements to get on to the apprenticeship degree you will need to have minimum amount of academic qualifications i.e. A-levels (or equivalent) and GCSEs in Maths and English. See below taken from College of Policing.

    "To apply to be on a PCDA (Police Constable Degree Apprenticeship), applicants are likely to have achieved a level 3 qualification (which is A-level or equivalent). Forces may accept training or work experience, whether undertaken in or outside England and Wales, which is considered to be equivalent to a level 3 qualification."

    There are three new ways to prepare new recruits for the role of constable, including an apprenticeship which trains you to degree level.

    • Apprenticeship. Join as a constable, and follow an apprenticeship in professional policing practice - you earn while you learn. This route normally takes three years with both on and off-the-job learning. On successfully finishing the programme, you complete your probation and achieve a degree.
    • Degree-holder entry. If you have a degree in any subject, you can join and follow a work-based programme, supported by off-the-job learning. This route normally takes two years, and the learning you have undergone is recognised in a graduate diploma in professional policing practice when you complete your probation.
    • Pre-join degree. If you want to study first, you can do a three year degree in professional policing at your own expense, and then apply to a force and follow a shorter on-the-job training programme. Being a special constable can be included in this route.

    Not a fan personally as I don't have A-levels and I know some switched on Coppers who hardly have any quals who have done the job fine! In my opinion Academic qualifications does not demonstrate you have the people skills to deal with complex and violent situations! I was going to join full time but decided against it!
     
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  14. Rover

    Rover Moderator

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    Would a QBE in Common Sense be acceptable?o_O;)
     
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  15. blindman3004

    blindman3004 Member

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    haha if there was a metric for measuring Common Sense then yes!
     
  16. ThreadpigeonsAlpha

    ThreadpigeonsAlpha Royal Marines Commando

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    Everyone I know in the public services HATES these apprentice/NVQ crap and thinks it’s a waste of time and money. And you end up with people that can write a good game, But can’t or don’t have the time to practice the practical side. And it eats into vital training time.

    The public sector is getting dragged into more and more irrelevant BS to cover for failings in other sectors or typical millennial crap.

    There is absolutely NO need for anyone to have or get a degree as a police officer. Once again the public sector choked by politics, bad management, stupid ideas and politicians using it as a political football to cover failings in local authority.

    The public services are an absolute joke.
     
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  17. Chelonian

    Chelonian Moderator

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    To be fair the obsession with measuring performance has got out of hand on a more widespread level. Starting with early year SATS in primary schools it also impacts the most gentle and innocuous of hobbies.
    An elderly lady of my acquaintance attended for many years a series of embroidery classes at her local adult education facility. Then she was told that all further courses had to incorporate an examination to measure 'performance'. -banghead- She never returned which was a detriment to the courses because she had many years of experience and was far more talented than the tutors.
     
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  18. Caversham

    Caversham Former RM Commando, Moderator

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    Years ago the public services, such as Police, Fire, Ambulance and Prisons, recruited large numbers from the forces, primarily because they had been in a disciplined and unified employment, with a rank structure that supported each other.

    All the service magazines, such as the G&L, Navy News and Soldier, carried adverts for different constabularies and other services openly welcoming those who had previously served.

    Unfortunately they appear to have moved away from this model and gone more down the line of academia, which has meant the expertise that former service men and women brought to the party has now been diluted.

    Alan
     
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  19. sharpe

    sharpe Member

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    Absolutely spot on there. Through the late 80’s and 90’s I would say as much as 50% of the front line shifts I was with comprised ex forces. I’m sorry to sound un pc but whilst there were assaults on police it was nothing anywhere near what it is now. You had a lot of very motivated people who could draw on a wealth of experience to talk their way out of trouble but could ultimately “handle themselves “ if needed!
     
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  20. sharpe

    sharpe Member

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    And don’t start me on redeployment of officers and implementation of civilian staff:)
     
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