Where would your hide the keys?

Illustrious

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@Johnny_Anonie the only thing that messes with @GreyWing admittedly good idea is the fact that it's car keys. It narrows down the options quite significantly, unless it's thousands of car keys, all the same manufacturer.

I'm reminded of a murder in Hampshire I believe it was, of which there was only one witness willing to come forward and he died of a heart attack a week later. There was no forensic evidence to be recovered, due to the building where the murder occurred having had thousands of gallons of water pumped through it over the course of several weeks to clean it. The only indication provided was by a search dog (trained to sniff for blood) that indicated on a nail on the floor. There was insufficient amounts remaining for the equipment to detect. A plus one for dogs on that.

During the search of the premises where the murder was alleged to have happened a set of keys were found, but the Police had absolutely no idea about the significance of these keys. It later came to light that there was for a private access area of the New forest. An area search of the private area revealed a rather poorly buried (however well on its way to decomposition) body.

The moral is; even the smallest of strings can be tugged to unravel the lot.

I've tried to find an article on it but had no joy. The background of the case was Aman was stabbed to death in a room full of people by a drug dealer. The guy was just presumed missing until one witness came forward to say "nah guv'nor, he be dead"and that sparked the investigation.

The police are good at what they do. The search teams are phenomenal at what they do. If it's there, they'll find it.
 

Dan8696

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I've got a friend who owns a few (a lot) tarantulas & other creepy crawly's.. Can I just say I'm spider-sitting and hide the keys in their den?
 

ThreadpigeonsAlpha

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@Johnny_Anonie the only thing that messes with @GreyWing admittedly good idea is the fact that it's car keys. It narrows down the options quite significantly, unless it's thousands of car keys, all the same manufacturer.

I'm reminded of a murder in Hampshire I believe it was, of which there was only one witness willing to come forward and he died of a heart attack a week later. There was no forensic evidence to be recovered, due to the building where the murder occurred having had thousands of gallons of water pumped through it over the course of several weeks to clean it. The only indication provided was by a search dog (trained to sniff for blood) that indicated on a nail on the floor. There was insufficient amounts remaining for the equipment to detect. A plus one for dogs on that.

During the search of the premises where the murder was alleged to have happened a set of keys were found, but the Police had absolutely no idea about the significance of these keys. It later came to light that there was for a private access area of the New forest. An area search of the private area revealed a rather poorly buried (however well on its way to decomposition) body.

The moral is; even the smallest of strings can be tugged to unravel the lot.

I've tried to find an article on it but had no joy. The background of the case was Aman was stabbed to death in a room full of people by a drug dealer. The guy was just presumed missing until one witness came forward to say "nah guv'nor, he be dead"and that sparked the investigation.

The police are good at what they do. The search teams are phenomenal at what they do. If it's there, they'll find it.
Iain Huntley was found by the press taking a seemly uninteresting picture of him sat in his car.
One detective couldn’t place what looked wrong with it, until it dawned on him that the tyres looked too new for the car.
Long story short they traced it to a local kwik fit where Huntley paid in cash but switched the letters of the Reg, the old tyres were found and the police then paired the tread of the tires to the tracks in the woods where the bodies were found. And the link was made. (Obviously there’s other factors like the mobile phones goodbye signature being turned off, but all pieces of the puzzle to help with a conviction)
 

sharpe

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@Johnny_Anonie the only thing that messes with @GreyWing admittedly good idea is the fact that it's car keys. It narrows down the options quite significantly, unless it's thousands of car keys, all the same manufacturer.

I'm reminded of a murder in Hampshire I believe it was, of which there was only one witness willing to come forward and he died of a heart attack a week later. There was no forensic evidence to be recovered, due to the building where the murder occurred having had thousands of gallons of water pumped through it over the course of several weeks to clean it. The only indication provided was by a search dog (trained to sniff for blood) that indicated on a nail on the floor. There was insufficient amounts remaining for the equipment to detect. A plus one for dogs on that.

During the search of the premises where the murder was alleged to have happened a set of keys were found, but the Police had absolutely no idea about the significance of these keys. It later came to light that there was for a private access area of the New forest. An area search of the private area revealed a rather poorly buried (however well on its way to decomposition) body.

The moral is; even the smallest of strings can be tugged to unravel the lot.

I've tried to find an article on it but had no joy. The background of the case was Aman was stabbed to death in a room full of people by a drug dealer. The guy was just presumed missing until one witness came forward to say "nah guv'nor, he be dead"and that sparked the investigation.

The police are good at what they do. The search teams are phenomenal at what they do. If it's there, they'll find it.
I finished up in cid on the murder incident team at the end of my service and I can honestly say we’re absolutely brilliant at solving murders. I get not great comfort at the time for victims but there’s been so many lessons over the years that have been learned.
 

KatnissEverdeen

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I finished up in cid on the murder incident team at the end of my service and I can honestly say we’re absolutely brilliant at solving murders. I get not great comfort at the time for victims but there’s been so many lessons over the years that have been learned.
do you work in the detective field? I have always had an interest in them as Job if the marines does not work out
 

sharpe

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do you work in the detective field? I have always had an interest in them as Job if the marines does not work out
Yes, I also spent time on traffic and a tactical support group as well as shift based response driver. The job I joined in the 80’s bore little resemblance to the 1 I left in the 2000’s so will need @Johnny_Anonie to fill in current opportunities for advancement to detective.
 

KatnissEverdeen

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Yes, I also spent time on traffic and a tactical support group as well as shift based response driver. The job I joined in the 80’s bore little resemblance to the 1 I left in the 2000’s so will need @Johnny_Anonie to fill in current opportunities for advancement to detective.
Ive always thought about this but could you get away with murder if you kill someone with an icicle and the evidence melts away. Sorry if its a disrespectful question and *text deleted* I am by no means plotting and or planning a murder I am just genuinely curious
 

sharpe

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Roald Dahls tales of the unexpected was a tv series in the 80’s. I always remember a story about a woman married to a police officer who murdered him by bashing his head in with a frozen lamb roast joint. The grieving widow invited his colleagues round for a meal and guess what was on the menu ;)
 

Duality

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Roald Dahls tales of the unexpected was a tv series in the 80’s. I always remember a story about a woman married to a police officer who murdered him by bashing his head in with a frozen lamb roast joint. The grieving widow invited his colleagues round for a meal and guess what was on the menu ;)
That was Lamb To The Slaughter. I did it as a short story in English.
 

sharpe

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Yes, book from the 50’s I believe, TV DEFINITELY 80s :D
 

Chelonian

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TV show starred the fragrant Susan George and BRIAN BLESSED!
 
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