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Whos watching SAS: Who Dares Swims

Discussion in 'Jollies Bar' started by Sortezy, Oct 19, 2015.

  1. Shadow Frog

    Shadow Frog Well-Known Member

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    Yeah totally agree.
     
  2. Vine

    Vine Active Member

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    Happens on prmc every other week (pretty much).
     
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  3. Jaykay2343

    Jaykay2343 Royal Marines Commando

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    Exactly ;-)

    At one point I thought I was going to quit running up a hill on endurance course. I thought "God, My mum will be so disappointed" that was enough to put one leg in front of the other and repeat :D
     
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  4. DD

    DD Well-Known Member

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    You can push yourself to your limit, but being pushed by someone else is a completely different matter.
     
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  5. Chelonian

    Chelonian Moderator

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    You're not alone mate. But I've only enjoyed one TV show in the past year. And I can't remember what that was.
     
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  6. Durxza

    Durxza Member

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    I think it's too early to tell how good or bad the series is going to be. I remember the final phase of last series being 24 hours of interrogation with constant stress positions and loud noises etc. If they replicate anything like that in the jungle environment then I think it will end up being pretty brutal.
     
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  7. NorthernYomper

    NorthernYomper Member

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    @Jaykay2343 The only guy, out of the people we were shown wrapping, that I can empathize with is the guy who had a panic attack and couldn't breathe. If you can't breathe you can't carry on. The guy was visibly gutted. Such a shame for him.
     
  8. TheRegain

    TheRegain Member

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    could try holding your breath haha
     
  9. Rover

    Rover Moderator

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    The reality of jungle operations.

     
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  10. Vine

    Vine Active Member

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    He could talk couldn't have been that bad it was him that said he wanted to go he was the one I had least empathy for. It's the genuine guys that get injury I feel for must be a horrible way to go if your nearer the end
     
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  11. NorthernYomper

    NorthernYomper Member

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    @Vine Anxiety is a real illness just as debilitating as any tangible injury. The fact he could talk afterwards doesn't mean he wasn't struggling with a panic attack, and unable to breathe while running.
     
  12. Vine

    Vine Active Member

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    Agreed but he said I want to hand my band in having a flap or not that's his choice, I don't see it the same as say a broken leg. These guys have undergone serious psychological testing aswell so there's potential that was just an excuse.
     
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  13. NorthernYomper

    NorthernYomper Member

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    Sure, but we have to take what he, and the doctor said at face value. If he was lying then he's a total wastrel and worthy of contempt, but the evidence points to him being gutted.
     
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  14. Chelonian

    Chelonian Moderator

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    Yep. Particularly to ensure that they will appear entertaining on a TV challenge show.
     
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  15. glos94

    glos94 Well-Known Member

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    I think once you accept that it is a TV show made for entertaining the general public, it's actually quite enjoyable.

    Who doesn't like watching arrogant bellends like 22 crash and burn :D
     
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  16. Rover

    Rover Moderator

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    SAS veteran who claimed he was taken hostage in Iraq and his comrades conducted 'mercy killings' on wounded Iraqis is accused of lying about his heroics

    By Alexander Ward For The Daily Mail (From a report in The Times)

    Published: 01:37, 21 October 2016 | Updated: 07:37, 21 October 2016

    Colin Maclachlan, 42, is alleged to have misled readers when he recounted a hostage situation and rescue in Iraq in 2003

    AN SAS veteran who claimed in a book that his comrades conducted ‘mercy killings’ on wounded Iraqi soldiers has been accused of lying.

    Colin Maclachlan, 42, is alleged to have misled readers when he recounted a hostage situation and rescue in Iraq in 2003, according to his former colleagues who say he has exaggerated his career in the Special Forces.

    A source told the Times, ‘That bloke is a Walter Mitty’, in a reference to a person who creates a fictional life that is more glamorous than reality.

    Mr Maclachlan, from Edinburgh, said that he operated in a unit which killed two or three mortally wounded Iraqi soldiers early into the Iraq war.

    Former colleagues of Mr Maclachlan refuted his claims that he had been taken hostage in Basra in 2005 and subjected to mock executions while naked, with a rifle pressed to the back of his head.

    Military police are examining the allegations, which have come to light in a draft manuscript Mr Maclachlan was involved with.

    When Mr Maclachlan claimed that he was held by Iraqi police in September 2005, he in fact had been captured in a less dramatic incident in 2004.

    According to former comrades he had left the SAS in May 2005, several months before the alleged incident that took place in Basra.

    He also claimed that he was in a team of SAS soliers who killed dying Iraqis after they struck a convoy of vehicles, with an anti-tank rocket near al-Qaim in western Iraq in March 2003, but in reality he was in the area and did not approach the wreckage.

    And while, he said that he had served in the SAS for ten or 12 years, he in fact joined the secretive regiment in 1998 or 1999 and had left the Special Forces by 2005.

    The claims have led to former colleagues accusing the television personality of cashing in on his military service.


    The serviceman are said to be aggrieved in particular about the ‘mercy killing’ comments made in the manuscript, which come at a time when the army has faced a witch hunt into thousands of its soldiers over the Iraq war.

    Last night, former members of the SAS called for the Ministry of Defence to change its policy regarding the Special Forces and issue a rebuttal of the claims made by Mr Maclachlan.

    The former SAS soldier first entered the army as a teenage member of the Royal Scots and gained fame on the Channel 4 programme Who Dares Wins, last year.

    A source added to the Times that General Sire Nicholas Carter, the head of the army, ‘Should stand up and say quite clearly this man is fabricating stories and does not represent the values of the SAS’.
     
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  17. Caversham

    Caversham Former RM Commando, Moderator

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    My view for what it's worth is that the Ulu is not all secondary jungle, but primary, where there is space to walk/march/yomp. In the 1960s there were two Units involved in operations in Malaysia and Indonesia. They were 40 and 42 Commandos. After the confrontation ended both Units continued to serve in that environment until late 1971, when British forces withdrew from that theatre.

    I actually enjoyed the Ulu. Once you were properly trained you took it in your stride and to be on exercise for around 3 weeks at a time was not a real challenge. You learnt to look after yourself, were never short of water, food and best for me, I was never freezing my nads off!

    As for the TV programme; you see similarities in PRMC and RT. Guys rock up full of bravado, vowing to "smash it" and before the first PT session is over they wrap. They can push out the press ups, pull ups and sit ups in the comfort of the gym, but get them to do it when they are soaking wet through, cold and hungry, then you see them heading for the gate.

    I haven't done any SF training, but I know a few and in general, they are the most unassuming guys you could wish to meet. Certainly not supermen. Indeed I found out a few weeks ago, that a guy I joined up with, who went SB, failed his 30 miler! I shall remind him of that as I completed mine with 50 minutes to spare and that he's second rate, or words to that effect!

    Alan
     
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  18. H01ty

    H01ty Active Member

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    For anyone interested in really boring factoids about the Malay origins of some RM slang (probably not but anyway):

    'Ulu'... In Malay it means "a place far away" or "the back and beyond". E.g. When rural folk move into the big city, they're described as being from the ulu. Malay for jungle is "Utan" (e.g. Orang Utan, man of the forest).

    Also 'bukit', meaning a small hill.
     
  19. Caversham

    Caversham Former RM Commando, Moderator

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    I should have mentioned the Malayan Emergency in the 1950s. A "light hearted" view of it is in Virgin Soldiers, by Leslie Thomas. The film was made at Nee Soon Garrison just down the road from Dieppe Barracks in Singapore where 40 Commando were based after their move from Burma Camp in Malaysia.

    Alan
     
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  20. Rover

    Rover Moderator

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    How soldiers of today learn the laws of the jungle

    From:

    Ministry of Defence

    First published:

    7 August 2015

    Part of:

    VJ Day 70th anniversary

    It is one of the world’s toughest environments, and lessons learned from the jungle warfare of the Second World War are still being taught to soldiers today.

    On 15 August, the eyes of the nation will fall upon veterans of the Far East campaign on the 70th anniversary of VJ Day. The war in the Far East saw much in the way of jungle warfare, with battles fought against the Japanese in Burma and Malaya.

    In the early stages of the Second World War, Allied Forces learned the lessons of the jungle the hard way, suffering defeats in 1941/42. With few exceptions, the Allies initially thought the jungle was impenetrable and therefore it could be disregarded for manoeuvre.

    The Japanese however had been honing their skills fighting the Chinese for a number of years and quickly showed how adept they were at utilising the terrain for outflanking and manoeuvre with dire consequences for the British.

    Forces TV: Surviving the Jungle

    But by 1944, there had been a complete review of British jungle tactics. Once the 14th Army, the Allied fighting Force in the Far East, was trained by the new bush warfare training establishments, the situation in Burma began to swing back in favour of the British.

    Those tactics are still taught to soldiers today by the British Army’s Training Team in Brunei, which prepares them to fight in the harshest of climates so they are best prepared for any future conflict that may arise.

    Major Arran Wade, the Officer Commanding Training Team Brunei, said:

    Training Team Brunei was formed out of the ashes of the battles fought against the Japanese in Burma and Malaya during the Second World War.

    It was proved that well-trained, mentally and physically robust British soldiers could function and fight just as well as any foe in this claustrophobic and exhausting environment.

    How to fight in the jungle

    At the heart of operating in the jungle is understanding how to live in the bush, and as much today as it was in the Second World War, it is a skill that has to be learned.

    Soldiers have to pay strict attention to their health and hygiene, be prepared to carry heavy loads for long periods and cope with the animal, insect and vegetation hazards.

    The obstacles are many – rivers with flash floods, swamps, falling trees and dangerous wildlife to name but a few – and the climate is hot, humid and wet.


    Lieutenant Colonel J P Cross, the last Commandant of the Jungle Warfare School in Malaya who served in the British Army from 1943 to 1982, summed up soldiering in the jungle environment by saying:

    It is a litany of sounds and a dictionary of sights. It is a state of permanent semi-twilight, gloomy even when sunshine does dapple the jungle floor with shadows…

    It is a state of permanent dampness, rain or sweat, of stifling, windless heat, of dirty clothes, of smelly bodies, of heavy loads, of cocked and loaded weapons, of tensed reflexes, of inaccurate maps, of constant vigilance, of tired limbs, of sore shoulders where equipment straps have bitten in… It is a challenge. It can never be taken for granted.
     
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