Your last session/workout!

ALDL9RM

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Glad it’s the weekend and no work for 2 days haha, can catch up on some sleep!
5 x 10 Strict Pull Ups @ 88kg BW (bit fluffy *text deleted*)
4 x 8 Pendlay Rows @ 60kg as ran out of weights at home
4 x 20 Rear Delt Fly w/ resistance band
Finished with curls to feel alpha
 

Blades1889

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Bench press 5x12 with 10 rep dropsets after each working set
6x10 overhead press with 4 clean and presses straight after
6x15 pendlay rows
3x12 jump squats
3x15 landline press
3x15 dumbbell curls

Don’t have a lot of plates at home so that’s why everything’s quite high rep and intense
 
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Weekend off to unfortunately catch up on a number of jobs. Back to it yesterday.

Monday AM:

5x rounds
30 burpees
40 squats
23 press ups
40 lunges
Pull ups - 1x5, 4x4 (been managing 5x5 recently so bit of an off day yesterday)

3x rounds
10 jump squats
15 press ups
2 pull ups

then another 4x2 pull ups to get the volume in.

Monday PM:

50min run. 35mins at an easy 9ish minute mile pace, straight into 10mins at 7:21 minute mile pace, finished with a slow 5mins to cool down.

This morning was just a quick and simple core circuit:

4x rounds:
35 sit ups
60sec plank
40 flutter kicks
12 windshield wipers

An easy 5-6 mile run at roughly 9 minute mile pace scheduled for later this afternoon.
 

Grimey Arches

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Today sessions.

Morning: 4 x 27 Incline/Decline/Close Grip Press Ups

Afternoon: 4 rounds VPJFT

Evening: 4 x 27 Press Ups/Bicycle Crunches/Squats/Diamond Press Ups/Lunges/Pike Push Ups/ 1 minute plank.

Just totalled all the variations and it's 728 press ups.
 
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Took inspiration from a couple Grizz Phys workouts today, with a few alterations to allow for ability and time.

6x rounds:
10 burpees
10 press ups
10 dumbbell thrusters - 5kg dumbbells using a pronated grip
10 press ups
10 burpees
4 pull ups

2x rounds:
10 press ups
3 pull ups

then to finish:

50 flutter kicks
10 burpees
40 mountain climbers
10 burpees
30 crunches
10 burpees
20 leg raises
10 burpees
20 bicycles
10 burpees
20 leg raises
10 burpees
30 crunches
10 burpees
40 mountain climbers
10 burpees
50 flutter kicks

Intervals/hill sprints scheduled for after work tonight, which usually totals around 5-6 miles.
 

Grimey Arches

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Took inspiration from a couple Grizz Phys workouts today, with a few alterations to allow for ability and time.

6x rounds:
10 burpees
10 press ups
10 dumbbell thrusters - 5kg dumbbells using a pronated grip
10 press ups
10 burpees
4 pull ups

2x rounds:
10 press ups
3 pull ups

then to finish:

50 flutter kicks
10 burpees
40 mountain climbers
10 burpees
30 crunches
10 burpees
20 leg raises
10 burpees
20 bicycles
10 burpees
20 leg raises
10 burpees
30 crunches
10 burpees
40 mountain climbers
10 burpees
50 flutter kicks

Intervals/hill sprints scheduled for after work tonight, which usually totals around 5-6 miles.
Just be careful not to overdue the cardio, do you run every day or every other?, and if you haven't read up about 80/20 running method it's worth a read.
 
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Just be careful not to overdue the cardio, do you run every day or every other?, and if you haven't read up about 80/20 running method it's worth a read.
Hey @Grimey Arches, I’ve heard of 80/20 running through others on here showing it’s benefits, but only properly been employing it in my training for the last 4/5 weeks. I’ve mostly been running 3-4 times a week over the last 6 months. Upped that to 4-5 times a week in the last 3 weeks with my running schedule going as below:

Sunday & Monday - 5-6 miles at an easy pace
Tuesdays/Thursdays - one day is hill sprints/intervals/HIIT of some kind, the other is 5-6 easy miles. All depending on time and how I’m feeling.
Friday - 10 miles at an easy pace

Saturdays are a solid rest day. Bodyweight circuits are fitted in where possible in the week. Generally Sunday and Thursday mornings at least, plus one or two sessions thrown in where possible across Monday - Wednesday.
 
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Rob20

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Just be careful not to overdue the cardio, do you run every day or every other?, and if you haven't read up about 80/20 running method it's worth a read.

I like the 80/20 theory in everyday life however not sure about military preparation. And yes agreed you can't run everyday or blitz yourself and expect to see improvement but... With an eye on training, forget the non-maximal stuff in ROP, no run you'll do in training will be at 20%. Everything will be high HR zones.

My theory was when I was prepping, 3 runs a week. A best effort 3 miler. A 6-8 miler however I through in some longer ones at 8min/mile just because I was off the back of a marathon and enjoyed it. And the third would be a 3 mile steady warm up followed by horrendous hill session with squats etc and then run the 3 miles back best effort.

I feel like my running was of a good standard on both PRMC and in training off the back of that personally.
 

Murk

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I like the 80/20 theory in everyday life however not sure about military preparation. And yes agreed you can't run everyday or blitz yourself and expect to see improvement but... With an eye on training, forget the non-maximal stuff in ROP, no run you'll do in training will be at 20%. Everything will be high HR zones.

My theory was when I was prepping, 3 runs a week. A best effort 3 miler. A 6-8 miler however I through in some longer ones at 8min/mile just because I was off the back of a marathon and enjoyed it. And the third would be a 3 mile steady warm up followed by horrendous hill session with squats etc and then run the 3 miles back best effort.

I feel like my running was of a good standard on both PRMC and in training off the back of that personally.
I think 80/20 training can be super effective but only if you can monitor heart rate strictly. In that case it can be tailored to prepare you for any sort of challenge.
The 80 part is basically making the once difficult not difficult without changing the heart rate.
Eg. Week 1 running 10 miles in zone 2 heart rate demands a 9 min per mile pace -> week 12 running 10 miles in zone 2 demands an 8 min per mile pace.
This also allows you to run the 20 part at full tilt faster I find.
Eg. Before I used to slam 6 mile best effort Monday followed by Hill sprints and then do best effort return runs on Tuesday and progress was slow. Now with 80/20 implemented i can run 30 minutes easy then slap my previous return times over 20 minutes and have energy for strength circuits. So when done right I think it could be good for military prep.
 

Rob20

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I think 80/20 training can be super effective but only if you can monitor heart rate strictly. In that case it can be tailored to prepare you for any sort of challenge.
The 80 part is basically making the once difficult not difficult without changing the heart rate.
Eg. Week 1 running 10 miles in zone 2 heart rate demands a 9 min per mile pace -> week 12 running 10 miles in zone 2 demands an 8 min per mile pace.
This also allows you to run the 20 part at full tilt faster I find.
Eg. Before I used to slam 6 mile best effort Monday followed by Hill sprints and then do best effort return runs on Tuesday and progress was slow. Now with 80/20 implemented i can run 30 minutes easy then slap my previous return times over 20 minutes and have energy for strength circuits. So when done right I think it could be good for military prep.

All good info mate. And as I previously said I do think its beneficial in every day life and certainly something I've used before.

However, running in training is nothing like every day running. I think I remember doing two clean fatigue runs in trainers in the first few weeks. Other than that its all either camp circuits mid gym session, weighted booted runs/speed marches and later on your bottom field/tarzan/endurance course runs. Running in boots and kit/weapon will put lads in the locker and personally from my experience I don't see sitting in Zone 2 for the majority of one's preparation appropriate for both physical or mental conditioning.

Im into the science behind things, but training is still quite caveman (to an extent of course) and I prefer the KISS approach.
 

Chelonian

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I like metrics; they fascinate me. Power meters on both cranks of my road bike to measure how many watts each leg pushes out, plus a HR monitor. Stark figures to remind me just how useless I actually am.

But as @Rob20 says RT is different and the difference should not be underestimated.

For example, anyone applying sport nutrition theory and carefully measuring carbs and protein in civilian life will spend a minimum of thirty-two weeks RT (plus the initial four weeks of ROP) existing on greasy sausages, chips and beans. :) One's body can still be 'a temple' but it will be a temple unfamiliar to professional athletes. Bloody effective for its purpose though.
 

Murk

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All good info mate. And as I previously said I do think its beneficial in every day life and certainly something I've used before.

However, running in training is nothing like every day running. I think I remember doing two clean fatigue runs in trainers in the first few weeks. Other than that its all either camp circuits mid gym session, weighted booted runs/speed marches and later on your bottom field/tarzan/endurance course runs. Running in boots and kit/weapon will put lads in the locker and personally from my experience I don't see sitting in Zone 2 for the majority of one's preparation appropriate for both physical or mental conditioning.

Im into the science behind things, but training is still quite caveman (to an extent of course) and I prefer the KISS approach.
Great insights mate.

I'm currently trying to get as much cardio improvement without injury before working up to the caveman mindset *text deleted*
I like metrics; they fascinate me. Power meters on both cranks of my road bike to measure how many watts each leg pushes out, plus a HR monitor. Stark figures to remind me just how useless I actually am.

But as @Rob20 says RT is different and the difference should not be underestimated.

For example, anyone applying sport nutrition theory and carefully measuring carbs and protein in civilian life will spend a minimum of thirty-two weeks RT (plus the initial four weeks of ROP) existing on greasy sausages, chips and beans. :) One's body can still be 'a temple' but it will be a temple unfamiliar to professional athletes. Bloody effective for its purpose though.
True this. I like nerding out over performance and nutrition and all of that but I try not to take it too seriously as I prepare for if and when I get to ROP for that reason *text deleted*
 

Grimey Arches

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Hey @Grimey Arches, I’ve heard of 80/20 running through others on here showing it’s benefits, but only properly been employing it in my training for the last 4/5 weeks. I’ve mostly been running 3-4 times a week over the last 6 months. Upped that to 4-5 times a week in the last 3 weeks with my running schedule going as below:

Sunday & Monday - 5-6 miles at an easy pace
Tuesdays/Thursdays - one day is hill sprints/intervals/HIIT of some kind, the other is 5-6 easy miles. All depending on time and how I’m feeling.
Friday - 10 miles at an easy pace

Saturdays are a solid rest day. Bodyweight circuits are fitted in where possible in the week. Generally Sunday and Thursday mornings at least, plus one or two sessions thrown in where possible across Monday - Wednesday.
I'm no expert bit I would be careful about running on consecutive days, fair play to you if your body can handle it.

Only reason I mentioned 80/20 as from previous posts I think you stated about applying some point next year, myself and many others have fallen for the age old issue of doing more then our bodies can handle so have ended up being unable to run for a few weeks while we've recovered.
 

Chelonian

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I'm no expert bit I would be careful about running on consecutive days, fair play to you if your body can handle it.

Agreed. I have no professional expertise but a long history of training niggles; most of which I could have avoided. The risks of overtraining should not be underestimated.

At the vey least ensure that stretching and a comprehensive mobility regime is adhered to whenever possible.
 

Grimey Arches

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I like the 80/20 theory in everyday life however not sure about military preparation. And yes agreed you can't run everyday or blitz yourself and expect to see improvement but... With an eye on training, forget the non-maximal stuff in ROP, no run you'll do in training will be at 20%. Everything will be high HR zones.

My theory was when I was prepping, 3 runs a week. A best effort 3 miler. A 6-8 miler however I through in some longer ones at 8min/mile just because I was off the back of a marathon and enjoyed it. And the third would be a 3 mile steady warm up followed by horrendous hill session with squats etc and then run the 3 miles back best effort.

I feel like my running was of a good standard on both PRMC and in training off the back of that personally.
Totally agree about it not being an all rounded plan for preperation for a military fitness test/course, I do believe it gives you the base level of fitness to work from and then once closer to the time you peak by incorporating other sessions in.
 

Grimey Arches

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All good info mate. And as I previously said I do think its beneficial in every day life and certainly something I've used before.

However, running in training is nothing like every day running. I think I remember doing two clean fatigue runs in trainers in the first few weeks. Other than that its all either camp circuits mid gym session, weighted booted runs/speed marches and later on your bottom field/tarzan/endurance course runs. Running in boots and kit/weapon will put lads in the locker and personally from my experience I don't see sitting in Zone 2 for the majority of one's preparation appropriate for both physical or mental conditioning.

Im into the science behind things, but training is still quite caveman (to an extent of course) and I prefer the KISS approach.
I do like the method as it has made me think about how I run and what pace I do it at, I don't personally follow it to the letter myself as I haven't got a HR monitor yet but soon will be picking up a Garmin.

My approach to ROP would be for any sessions not to exceed the intensity I'd be doing before joining, arriving being as physically prepared as possible could make those 4 weeks more easier on the body and less chance of injury and being sent home.

Totally agree on the Zone 2 point, candidates need to push themselves as hard as possible while preparing once capable of being able to do so.
 

Grimey Arches

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I like metrics; they fascinate me. Power meters on both cranks of my road bike to measure how many watts each leg pushes out, plus a HR monitor. Stark figures to remind me just how useless I actually am.

But as @Rob20 says RT is different and the difference should not be underestimated.

For example, anyone applying sport nutrition theory and carefully measuring carbs and protein in civilian life will spend a minimum of thirty-two weeks RT (plus the initial four weeks of ROP) existing on greasy sausages, chips and beans. :) One's body can still be 'a temple' but it will be a temple unfamiliar to professional athletes. Bloody effective for its purpose though.
I do think tracking your calorie intake and macros before joining can only benefit you even more, I believe educating yourself about your body is something everyone should do and in today's society it seems people really don't understand the basics.

Agreed it has no place in actual RT but it's a great tool to be used, as an example in training you could be doing 2 sessions of phys and working of very little sleep. Most would advise not to overtrain and get adequate rest but training like that does make you stronger mentally but could risk an injury before you join.

Our society seems to lack any understanding of food or what is in it these days.

To qoute the new Mcdonalds advert song 'do you want to live forever', made me chuckle when I heard it. I know the main theme is about children but it seems not the best matching lyrics for that brand.
 

smashlegs

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I'm no expert bit I would be careful about running on consecutive days, fair play to you if your body can handle it.

Only reason I mentioned 80/20 as from previous posts I think you stated about applying some point next year, myself and many others have fallen for the age old issue of doing more then our bodies can handle so have ended up being unable to run for a few weeks while we've recovered.

I would say the 80/20 rules should only be applied if you’re running say 5 or more times a week. Applying the 80/20 rules over say 3runs per week, in my opinion won’t bring great improvements. 3 runs a week isn’t much, so If anyone was to run 3x a week I would make sure you’re pushing it on at least two of those. But everyone’s different I guess.
 

Grimey Arches

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I would say the 80/20 rules should only be applied if you’re running say 5 or more times a week. Applying the 80/20 rules over say 3runs per week, in my opinion won’t bring great improvements. 3 runs a week isn’t much, so If anyone was to run 3x a week I would make sure you’re pushing it on at least two of those. But everyone’s different I guess.
I'm no expert on it to be honest but it can be applied to time or mileage, like stated before you can get results with 3 runs a week but if you can train more why wouldn't you.

I just like the focus it puts on building your mileage up, perceived effort and heart rate zones as I've never really looked in to that area before.
 

smashlegs

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I'm no expert on it to be honest but it can be applied to time or mileage, like stated before you can get results with 3 runs a week but if you can train more why wouldn't you.

I just like the focus it puts on building your mileage up, perceived effort and heart rate zones as I've never really looked in to that area before.
I’m no expert either, purely opinion based from my own experience of running different variations.

Without a shadow of a doubt it’s the best way to increase milage. However I personally don’t think it’s the best format to use for a running routine that consists of only 3 runs as week. If somebody is allowing their body to recover more days than it is training, then you better make sure you’re pushing it on those three otherwise you won’t really be forcing your body to change, it’ll just stay the same. As your body does adapt to its demands you’ll have to increase different variables and a very major one is frequency. Often the more you train something, the better you get at it.

I’ll add i’m currently following a somewhat 80/20 format with my runs but I’m running 5-6x a week now, rather than the 3x I used to.

I’m quiet interested in seeing how much running we’ll be doing in RT, how often, how far, as I know there’s a lot of variation within the 32weeks. All I know is it’ll be balls to the wall throughout!
 
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